How does the marsh de Vaux play its role as a sponge?

One last installment next summer

Held next summer, the last phase will consist of the remodeling of the observation path on stilts that crosses this reservoir.

It will thus allow you to observe the flora of this rare place where 160 species of plants have been listed. There are classics like rushes and rushes, or even barberry, with lemon-yellow wood, the basis of succulent jellies. But also the Teasel, whose spikes were once used to carde wool.

Fireweed forms superb blue spots that contrast harmoniously with the creamy white of the Meadowsweet or Angeliques and the yellow of the Goldenrods that invade this wetland. With the painted Fritillaries and the Cottongrass with cotton blossoms, the image is superb.

Rarer is the Epipactis des marais, a large orchid that is one of the forty varieties listed on the plateau. The most difficult to find remains the Drosera, a carnivorous plant whose tail bubbles, similar to dewdrops, trap the insects that complement the meager diet of this swamp plant.

Carried out next summer, it will consist of the renovation of the observation trail on stilts that crosses this swamp. It will thus allow you to observe the flora of this rare place where 160 species of plants have been listed. There are classics like rushes and rushes, or even barberry, with lemon-yellow wood, the basis of succulent jellies. But also the Teasel, whose spikes were once used to carde wool.

Fireweed forms superb blue spots that contrast harmoniously with the creamy white of the Meadowsweet or Angeliques and the yellow of the Goldenrods that invade this wetland. With the painted Fritillaries and the Cottongrass with cotton blossoms, the image is superb. Rarer is the Epipactis des marais, a large orchid that is one of the forty varieties listed on the plateau. The most difficult to find remains the Drosera, a carnivorous plant whose tail bubbles, similar to dewdrops, trap the insects that complement the meager diet of this swamp plant.